Ecosystem-based fisheries management : progress, importance, and impacts in the United States / Jason S. Link, Anthony R. Marshak.

By: Link, Jason S [author.].
Contributor(s): Marshak, Anthony R [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2021Edition: First edition.Description: xxxiii, 678 pages : illustrations (black and white, and colour) ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780192843463; 019284346X.Subject(s): MARINE ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT | MARINE FISH | ECOLOGY | FISH POPULATIONS | ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT | FISHERY MANAGEMENT | MARINE FISHERIES | USAHoldings: GRETA POINT: 574.5:639.2 LIN
Contents:
About the Authors -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Foreword / Richard Merrick -- Endorsements -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Methods for Characterizing and Examining Marine Fishery Ecosystems -- 3. The New England Region -- 4. The U.S. Mid-Atlantic Region -- 5. The U.S. South Atlantic Region -- 6. The U.S. Caribbean Region -- 7. The Northern Gulf of Mexico -- 8. The U.S. Pacific Region -- 9. The U.S. North Pacific Region -- 10. The U.S. Western Pacific Region -- 11. Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs) -- 12. An Examination of Progress Toward Ecosystem-Based Management of Living Marine Resources in the U.S. -- 13. So What? -- Index.
Summary: Ecosystem-based fishery management (EBFM) is rapidly becoming the default approach in global fisheries management. The clarity of what EBFM means is sharpening each year and there is now a real need to evaluate progress and assess the effectiveness and impacts. By examining a suite of over 90 indicators (including socioeconomic, governance, environmental forcing, major pressures, systems ecology, and fisheries criteria) for 9 major US fishery ecosystem jurisdictions, the authors systematically track the progress the country has made towards advancing EBFM and making it an operational reality. The assessment covers a wide range of data in both time (multiple decades) and space (from the tropics to the poles, representing over 10% of the world's ocean surface area). The authors view progress towards the implementation of EBFM as synonymous with improved management of living marine resources in general, and highlight the findings from a national perspective. Although US-centric, the lessons learned are directly applicable for all parts of the global ocean. Much work remains, but significant progress has already been made to better address many of the challenges facing the sustainable management of our living marine resources. This is an essential and accessible reference for all fisheries professionals who are currently practicing, or progressing towards, ecosystem-based fisheries management. It will also be of relevance and use to researchers, teachers, managers, and graduate students in marine ecology, fisheries biology, biological oceanography, global change biology, conservation biology, and marine resource management. -- Publisher's website
List(s) this item appears in: New Titles
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
BOOK BOOK WELLINGTON
BOOKS
574.5:639.2 LIN 1 Issued 01/09/2022 B021955

Includes bibliographical references and index (pages 663-678)

About the Authors -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Foreword / Richard Merrick -- Endorsements -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Methods for Characterizing and Examining Marine Fishery Ecosystems -- 3. The New England Region -- 4. The U.S. Mid-Atlantic Region -- 5. The U.S. South Atlantic Region -- 6. The U.S. Caribbean Region -- 7. The Northern Gulf of Mexico -- 8. The U.S. Pacific Region -- 9. The U.S. North Pacific Region -- 10. The U.S. Western Pacific Region -- 11. Regional Fisheries Management Organizations (RFMOs) -- 12. An Examination of Progress Toward Ecosystem-Based Management of Living Marine Resources in the U.S. -- 13. So What? -- Index.

Ecosystem-based fishery management (EBFM) is rapidly becoming the default approach in global fisheries management. The clarity of what EBFM means is sharpening each year and there is now a real need to evaluate progress and assess the effectiveness and impacts. By examining a suite of over 90 indicators (including socioeconomic, governance, environmental forcing, major pressures, systems ecology, and fisheries criteria) for 9 major US fishery ecosystem jurisdictions, the authors systematically track the progress the country has made towards advancing EBFM and making it an operational reality. The assessment covers a wide range of data in both time (multiple decades) and space (from the tropics to the poles, representing over 10% of the world's ocean surface area). The authors view progress towards the implementation of EBFM as synonymous with improved management of living marine resources in general, and highlight the findings from a national perspective. Although US-centric, the lessons learned are directly applicable for all parts of the global ocean. Much work remains, but significant progress has already been made to better address many of the challenges facing the sustainable management of our living marine resources. This is an essential and accessible reference for all fisheries professionals who are currently practicing, or progressing towards, ecosystem-based fisheries management. It will also be of relevance and use to researchers, teachers, managers, and graduate students in marine ecology, fisheries biology, biological oceanography, global change biology, conservation biology, and marine resource management. -- Publisher's website

GRETA POINT: 574.5:639.2 LIN

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.

Powered by Koha