The future of commercial fishing in Aotearoa New Zealand / a report from the Office of the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor, Kaitohutohu Mātanga Pūtaiao Matua ki te Pirimia.

Contributor(s): Gerrard, Juliet A. Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor | New Zealand. Office of the Prime Minister's Science Advisory Committee.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Auckland : Office of the Prime Minister's Chief Science Advisor, 2021Description: 1 online resource.ISBN: 9780473562038.Subject(s): FISHERIES | COMMERCIAL FISHING | FISHERY MANAGEMENT | NEW ZEALAND | FISHERIES RESEARCH | FISHERY SCIENCES | BEST PRACTICES | MARINE ENVIRONMENT | MĀTAURANGA MĀORI | DATA | KNOWLEDGE | GAP ANALYSIS | INNOVATION | TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONSHoldings: ELECTRONIC Online resources: Office of the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor website | NIWA document server | References & Appendices | Key Messages | National Digital Heritage Archive Open Access
Contents:
Full report (362 pages) -- References & Appendices (71 pages) -- Key messages (68 pages)
Summary: This report was prepared after a request from the Prime Minister in late 2019. By drawing on local and international research and experience, and highlighting best practice examples, we aim to inspire innovative thinking and changes in fisheries management in 2040 and beyond. The report aims to identify ways we can fill knowledge gaps, increase our understanding of the marine environment, and ultimately take a more holistic approach to fisheries management. The evidence base for this report includes scientific and peer-reviewed literature, government, research, and technical reports, working papers, and personal communications. The report does not attempt to cost solutions nor to prioritise them at a detailed level. The report outlines detailed recommendations in seven themes, which represent the conversations in our panel meetings. We describe the challenging context in which commercial fishing takes place and lay out the many stressors faced by the marine environment. To help understand how to make progress in this contested area, we try to capture the complexities of commercial fishing in 2020. Finally, we outline ideas and innovations that could help us fish smarter in the future, and end with an aspirational vision to challenge old thinking and encourage new.
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PDF PDF WELLINGTON
ONLINE
ELECTRONIC 1 Not for loan 398396

"February 2021."

Expert panel: Juliet Gerrard, Co-Chair, Craig Ellison, Co-Chair, Seafood New Zealand, Dr Chris Cornelisen, Cawthron Institute, Livia Esterhazy, World Wildlife Fund, Dr Rosemary Hurst, NIWA, Dr Andrew Jeffs, University of Auckland, Andrew (Anaru) Luke, Cawthron Institute, Raewyn Peart, Environmental Defence Society, Professor Michael Plank, University of Canterbury, Dion Tuuta, formerly Te Ohu Kaimoana, Dr Maren Wellenreuther, Plant & Food Research.

Archived by the National Library of New Zealand in PDF.

Full report (362 pages) -- References & Appendices (71 pages) -- Key messages (68 pages)

This report was prepared after a request from the Prime Minister in late 2019. By drawing on local and international research and experience, and highlighting best practice examples, we aim to inspire innovative thinking and changes in fisheries management in 2040 and beyond. The report aims to identify ways we can fill knowledge gaps, increase our understanding of the marine environment, and ultimately take a more holistic approach to fisheries management. The evidence base for this report includes scientific and peer-reviewed literature, government, research, and technical reports, working papers, and personal communications. The report does not attempt to cost solutions nor to prioritise them at a detailed level. The report outlines detailed recommendations in seven themes, which represent the conversations in our panel meetings. We describe the challenging context in which commercial fishing takes place and lay out the many stressors faced by the marine environment. To help understand how to make progress in this contested area, we try to capture the complexities of commercial fishing in 2020. Finally, we outline ideas and innovations that could help us fish smarter in the future, and end with an aspirational vision to challenge old thinking and encourage new.

ELECTRONIC

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