Waikato stormwater runoff modelling guideline / Earl Shaver.

By: Shaver, Earl [author].
Contributor(s): Waikato (N.Z.). Regional Council (2011- ).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Waikato Regional Council technical report (2011): 2020/06Publisher: Hamilton, New Zealand : Waikato Regional Council, 2020Description: 1 online resource.Subject(s): RUNOFF | MATHEMATICAL MODELS | WAIKATO | NEW ZEALAND | RAINFALL | RAINFALLS | STORMWATER | ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS | CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS | SUBSURFACE DRAINAGEHoldings: ELECTRONIC Online resources: TR 2020/06 Waikato Regional Council website | National Digital Heritage Archive Open Access Summary: Hamilton is the fourth largest city in New Zealand and while not equivalent in size to the large metropolitans, the population is forecast to increase by 32 per cent between 2006 and 20311. The population in the Waikato Region grew faster than the national average between 2006 and 2013, with fastest growth experienced in the Waikato District (10.1%), Waipa District (9.8%) and Hamilton City (9.3%). The region supports over 35,000 km of streams and rivers, many of which are impacted by both rural and urban land use. The level of forecasted population growth in the region makes it imperative to ensure appropriate management of urban stormwater to help to protect our region’s waterways from further degradation and to restore and enhance them.
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ELECTRONIC 1 Not for loan 397763

Archived by the National Library of New Zealand in PDF.

Hamilton is the fourth largest city in New Zealand and while not equivalent in size to the large metropolitans, the population is forecast to increase by 32 per cent between 2006 and 20311. The population in the Waikato Region grew faster than the national average between 2006 and 2013, with fastest growth experienced in the Waikato District (10.1%), Waipa District (9.8%) and Hamilton City (9.3%). The region supports over 35,000 km of streams and rivers, many of which are impacted by both rural and urban land use. The level of forecasted population growth in the region makes it imperative to ensure appropriate management of urban stormwater to help to protect our region’s waterways from further degradation and to restore and enhance them.

ELECTRONIC

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