Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Exploring the workplace for LGBT+ physical scientists : a report / by the Institute of Physics, Royal Astronomical Society and Royal Society of Chemistry.

Contributor(s): Institute of Physics (Great Britain) | Royal Astronomical Society (Great Britain) | Royal Society of Chemistry (Great Britain).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Institute of Physics, Royal Astronomical Society and Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019Description: 51 pages : graphs ; 30 cm.Subject(s): EMPLOYMENT | RESEARCH ESTABLISHMENTS | SCIENTIFIC ORGANIZATIONS | DIVERSITY IN THE WORKPLACE | SEXUAL MINORITIES | HARASSMENT | DISCRIMINATION | SCIENTISTS | PERSONNEL | INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS | WORKPLACE | WORK ENVIRONMENTHoldings: GRETA POINT: 331.1 EXP Online resources: Royal Society of Chemistry pdf | NIWA document server
Contents:
Letter from the CEOs -- Summary of key findings -- Areas for increased action -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The current workplace climate -- 2.1 Despite progress, the environment is still uneven -- 2.2 The nature of hostility in a supportive environment -- 2.3 Actions are at the core of a supportive environment -- 3. Relevant issues for the physical sciences -- 3.1 Life outside work -- 3.2 Scientists are in an international community -- 3.3 Networks bring LGBT+ scientists together -- 3.4 Doing the best for science -- 4. Areas for increased action -- 4.1 Work to build a visibly welcoming community -- 4.2 Review and improve policies -- 4.3 Introduce and improve training -- Appendix 1: Glossary -- Appendix 2: Research methodology -- 2a Questionnaire responses -- 2b LGBT+ characteristics of the respondents -- 2c Interview participants -- References.
Summary: The Institute of Physics, Royal Astronomical Society and Royal Society of Chemistry have been working together to create a network of support for members of the physical sciences community who identified as LGBT+, and their allies. They established a LGBT+ member-led steering group to oversee this work.Summary: Many LGBT+ people do not find the physical sciences to be a comfortable working environment – and have thought about leaving. Despite progress, many LGBT+ physical scientists have experienced or observed exclusionary behaviour in the workplace. In partnership with the Institute of Physics and the Royal Astronomical Society, we have conducted a comprehensive survey to gather data from across the community – giving us new insights into the current workplace environment for LGBT+ physical scientists -- Royal Society of Chemistry website.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
BOOK BOOK WELLINGTON
BOOKS
331.1 EXP 1 Available B020799

Includes bibliographical references.

Letter from the CEOs -- Summary of key findings -- Areas for increased action -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The current workplace climate -- 2.1 Despite progress, the environment is still uneven -- 2.2 The nature of hostility in a supportive environment -- 2.3 Actions are at the core of a supportive environment -- 3. Relevant issues for the physical sciences -- 3.1 Life outside work -- 3.2 Scientists are in an international community -- 3.3 Networks bring LGBT+ scientists together -- 3.4 Doing the best for science -- 4. Areas for increased action -- 4.1 Work to build a visibly welcoming community -- 4.2 Review and improve policies -- 4.3 Introduce and improve training -- Appendix 1: Glossary -- Appendix 2: Research methodology -- 2a Questionnaire responses -- 2b LGBT+ characteristics of the respondents -- 2c Interview participants -- References.

The Institute of Physics, Royal Astronomical Society and Royal Society of Chemistry have been working together to create a network of support for members of the physical sciences community who identified as LGBT+, and their allies. They established a LGBT+ member-led steering group to oversee this work.

Many LGBT+ people do not find the physical sciences to be a comfortable working environment – and have thought about leaving. Despite progress, many LGBT+ physical scientists have experienced or observed exclusionary behaviour in the workplace. In partnership with the Institute of Physics and the Royal Astronomical Society, we have conducted a comprehensive survey to gather data from across the community – giving us new insights into the current workplace environment for LGBT+ physical scientists -- Royal Society of Chemistry website.

GRETA POINT: 331.1 EXP

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha