Survey of New Zealand sea lion prey at the Auckland Islands and Stewart Snares Shelf / J. Roberts, R.L. O’Driscoll, A. Hart, B. Graham.

Contributor(s): New Zealand. Ministry for Primary Industries [issuing body.] | Fisheries New Zealand (Government agency).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: New Zealand aquatic environment and biodiversity report: no. 204.Publisher: Wellington : Fisheries New Zealand Tini a Tangaroa, 2018.Description: 1 online resource : colour illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781988571324 (online).Other title: NZ sea lion prey survey [Running title].Subject(s): NEW ZEALAND SEA LIONS | PHOCARCTOS HOOKERI | FEEDING ECOLOGY | FOOD PREFERENCES | PREY | OCTOPI | ENTEROCTOPUS ZEALANDICUS | AUCKLAND ISLANDS | SNARES SHELF | NEW ZEALANDHoldings: ELECTRONIC Online resources: No. 204 NIWA document server Summary: The main breeding population of New Zealand (NZ) sea lions (Otariidae: Phocarctos hookeri) at the Auckland Islands has declined by about 50% since the late-1990s. This population displays numerous indicators of nutritional stress, but the precise mechanisms of this stress (e.g., essential prey species and changes in their availability to NZ sea lions) remain poorly understood. This precludes a meaningful assessment of the effects of environmental change or indirect fishery effects on NZ sea lion populations.
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ELECTRONIC 1 Not for loan 394890

"November 2018."

Published 16 Apr 2019.

Includes bibliographical references.

The main breeding population of New Zealand (NZ) sea lions (Otariidae: Phocarctos hookeri) at the Auckland Islands has declined by about 50% since the late-1990s. This population displays numerous indicators of nutritional stress, but the precise mechanisms of this stress (e.g., essential prey species and changes in their availability to NZ sea lions) remain poorly understood. This precludes a meaningful assessment of the effects of environmental change or indirect fishery effects on NZ sea lion populations.

ELECTRONIC

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