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Cost benefits analysis and the environment : further developments and policy use / Giles Atkinson, Nis Axel Braathen, Ben Groom and Susana Mourato.

By: Atkinson, Giles, 1969- [author.].
Contributor(s): Braathen, Nis Axel [additional author.] | Mourato, Susana [additional author.] | Groom, Ben [additional author.] | Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Paris : Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, [2018]Copyright date: ©2018Description: 454 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9264085157; 9789264085152.Subject(s): ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION | ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT | COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS | COST EFFECTIVENESS | ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES | VALUATION | MARKET ECONOMICS | CLIMATIC CHANGES | ECOSYSTEM SERVICES | SPECIES DIVERSITY | ECOSYSTEMS | OVERVIEWSHoldings: GRETA POINT: 338.58:502.17 ATK
Contents:
Chapter 1. Overview of main issues -- Chapter 2. Environmental cost-benefit analysis: foundations, stages and evolving issues -- Part I Methods of environmental valuation -- Chapter 3. Revealed preference methods -- Chapter 4. Contingent valuation method -- Chapter 5. Discrete choice experiments -- Chapter 6. Value transfer -- Chapter 7. Subjective well-being valuation -- Part II Core elements of cos-benefit analysis -- Chapter 8. Discounting -- Chapter 9. Uncertainty -- Chapter 10. Quasi-option value -- Chapter 11. Distribution and cost-benefit analysis -- Part III Selected issues in environmental cost-benefit analysis -- Chapter 12. Sustainability and natural capital -- Chapter 13. Ecosystem services and biodiversity -- Chapter 14. The social cost of carbon -- Chapter 15. Heal valuation -- Part IV Cost-benefit analysis in practice -- Chapter 16. Current use of cost-benefit analysis -- Chapter 17. Political economy of cost-benefit analysis -- Chapter 17. Political economy of cost-benefit analysis -- Chapter 18. CBA and other decision-making approaches.
Summary: This book explores recent developments in environmental cost-benefit analysis (CBA). This is defined as the application of CBA to projects or policies that have the deliberate aim of environmental improvement or are actions that affect, in some way, the natural environment as an indirect consequence. It builds on the previous OECD book by David Pearce et al. (2006), which took as its starting point that a number of developments in CBA, taken together, altered the way in which many economists would argue CBA should be carried out and that this was particularly so in the context of policies and projects with significant environmental impacts. It is a primary objective of the current book not only to assess more recent advances in CBA theory but also to identify how specific developments illustrate key thematic narratives with implications for practical use of environmental CBA in policy formulation and appraisal of investment projects. Perhaps the most significant development is the contribution of climate economics in its response to the challenge of appraising policy actions to mitigate (or adapt to) climate change. Work in this area has increased the focus on how to value costs and benefits that occur far into the future, particularly by showing how conventional procedures for establishing the social discount rate become highly problematic in this intergenerational context and what new approaches might be needed. The contribution of climate economics has also entailed thinking further about uncertainty in CBA, especially where uncertain outcomes might be associated with large (and adverse) impacts.
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Includes bibliographical references.

Chapter 1. Overview of main issues -- Chapter 2. Environmental cost-benefit analysis: foundations, stages and evolving issues -- Part I Methods of environmental valuation -- Chapter 3. Revealed preference methods -- Chapter 4. Contingent valuation method -- Chapter 5. Discrete choice experiments -- Chapter 6. Value transfer -- Chapter 7. Subjective well-being valuation -- Part II Core elements of cos-benefit analysis -- Chapter 8. Discounting -- Chapter 9. Uncertainty -- Chapter 10. Quasi-option value -- Chapter 11. Distribution and cost-benefit analysis -- Part III Selected issues in environmental cost-benefit analysis -- Chapter 12. Sustainability and natural capital -- Chapter 13. Ecosystem services and biodiversity -- Chapter 14. The social cost of carbon -- Chapter 15. Heal valuation -- Part IV Cost-benefit analysis in practice -- Chapter 16. Current use of cost-benefit analysis -- Chapter 17. Political economy of cost-benefit analysis -- Chapter 17. Political economy of cost-benefit analysis -- Chapter 18. CBA and other decision-making approaches.

This book explores recent developments in environmental cost-benefit analysis (CBA). This is defined as the application of CBA to projects or policies that have the deliberate aim of environmental improvement or are actions that affect, in some way, the natural environment as an indirect consequence. It builds on the previous OECD book by David Pearce et al. (2006), which took as its starting point that a number of developments in CBA, taken together, altered the way in which many economists would argue CBA should be carried out and that this was particularly so in the context of policies and projects with significant environmental impacts. It is a primary objective of the current book not only to assess more recent advances in CBA theory but also to identify how specific developments illustrate key thematic narratives with implications for practical use of environmental CBA in policy formulation and appraisal of investment projects. Perhaps the most significant development is the contribution of climate economics in its response to the challenge of appraising policy actions to mitigate (or adapt to) climate change. Work in this area has increased the focus on how to value costs and benefits that occur far into the future, particularly by showing how conventional procedures for establishing the social discount rate become highly problematic in this intergenerational context and what new approaches might be needed. The contribution of climate economics has also entailed thinking further about uncertainty in CBA, especially where uncertain outcomes might be associated with large (and adverse) impacts.

GRETA POINT: 338.58:502.17 ATK

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