Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Effective ecological monitoring / David Lindenmayer and Gene Likens (authors).

By: Lindenmayer, David.
Contributor(s): Likens, Gene E, 1935-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Clayton, Vic. : CSIRO Publishing, 2018.Edition: Second edition.Description: xiv, 210 pages: illustrations ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9781486308927; 1486308929; 9781486308934; 1486308937; 9781486308941; 1486308945.Subject(s): ECOLOGICAL STUDIES | ECOLOGY | BASELINE STUDIES | TIME SERIES | ECOSYSTEMS | ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING | ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS | EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH | PLANNING | METHODS | ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENTHoldings: GRETA POINT: 574 LIN
Contents:
1: Introduction -- Some of the ecological values and uses of long-term datasets -- Poor record of long-term ecological monitoring -- Why we wrote this book -- 2: Why monitoring fails -- Characteristics of ineffective monitoring programs -- Other factors contributing to ineffective monitoring programs -- 3: What makes long-term monitoring effective? -- Characteristics of effective monitoring programs -- Little things matter a lot! Some 'tricks of the trade' -- The adaptive monitoring framework -- 4: The problematic, the effective and the ugly – some case studies -- The problematic -- The effective -- Need to wait and see -- The ugly -- 5: The upshot – our general conclusions -- Changes in culture needed to facilitate monitoring -- Good things that can come from non-question based monitoring -- The role of citizen science in long-term monitoring -- The challenge of intellectual property and data sharing -- The challenges in effective monitoring of rare, threatened and endangered species -- The major challenge of keeping monitoring and long-term studies going -- The big issue of integrating different kinds of monitoring -- Approaches to integrate data from different kinds of monitoring – Index.
Summary: Long-term monitoring programs are fundamental to understanding the natural environment and managing major environmental problems. Yet they are often done very poorly and ineffectively. This second edition of Effective Ecological Monitoring describes what makes monitoring programs successful and how to ensure that long-term monitoring studies persist. The book includes new sections comparing surveillance-based and question-based monitoring, analysing environmental observation networks, and provides examples of adaptive monitoring.
List(s) this item appears in: New Titles
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
BOOK BOOK WELLINGTON
BOOKS
574 LIN 1 Issued 22/11/2018 B018778
BOOK BOOK WELLINGTON
BOOKS
574 LIN 2 Issued 07/02/2019 B018942

Prepublication record (machine generated from publisher information).

Includes bibliographical references and index.

1: Introduction -- Some of the ecological values and uses of long-term datasets -- Poor record of long-term ecological monitoring -- Why we wrote this book -- 2: Why monitoring fails -- Characteristics of ineffective monitoring programs -- Other factors contributing to ineffective monitoring programs -- 3: What makes long-term monitoring effective? -- Characteristics of effective monitoring programs -- Little things matter a lot! Some 'tricks of the trade' -- The adaptive monitoring framework -- 4: The problematic, the effective and the ugly – some case studies -- The problematic -- The effective -- Need to wait and see -- The ugly -- 5: The upshot – our general conclusions -- Changes in culture needed to facilitate monitoring -- Good things that can come from non-question based monitoring -- The role of citizen science in long-term monitoring -- The challenge of intellectual property and data sharing -- The challenges in effective monitoring of rare, threatened and endangered species -- The major challenge of keeping monitoring and long-term studies going -- The big issue of integrating different kinds of monitoring -- Approaches to integrate data from different kinds of monitoring – Index.

Long-term monitoring programs are fundamental to understanding the natural environment and managing major environmental problems. Yet they are often done very poorly and ineffectively. This second edition of Effective Ecological Monitoring describes what makes monitoring programs successful and how to ensure that long-term monitoring studies persist. The book includes new sections comparing surveillance-based and question-based monitoring, analysing environmental observation networks, and provides examples of adaptive monitoring.

GRETA POINT: 574 LIN

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha