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Biological individuality : integrating scientific, philosophical, and historical perspectives / edited by Scott Lidgard and Lynn K. Nyhart.

Contributor(s): Lidgard, Scott [editor,, author.] | Nyhart, Lynn K [editor,, author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Chicago, IL : The University of Chicago Press, 2017.Copyright date: ©2017Description: 361 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780226446455; 022644645X; 9780226446318; 022644631X.Subject(s): BIOLOGY | PHILOSOPHY | VARIATIONS | EVOLUTIONHoldings: GRETA POINT: 573.2 BIO
Contents:
Introduction : working together on individuality / Lynn K. Nyhart and Scott Lidgard -- The work of biological individuality : concepts and contexts / Scott Lidgard and Lynn K. Nyhart -- Cells, colonies, and clones : individuality in the volvocine algae / Matthew D. Herron -- Individuality and the control of life cycles / Beckett Sterner -- Discovering the ties that bind : cell-cell communication and the development of cell sociology / Andrew S. Reynolds -- Alternation of generations and individuality, 1851 / Lynn K. Nyhart and Scott Lidgard -- Spencer's evolutionary entanglement : from liminal individuals to implicit collectivities / Snait Gissis -- Biological individuality and enkapsis : from Martin Heidenhain's synthesiology to the Völkisch national community / Olivier Rieppel -- Parasitology, zoology, and society in France, ca. 1880-1920 / Michael A. Osborne -- Metabolism, autonomy, and individuality / Hannah Landecker -- Bodily parts in the structure-function dialectic / Ingo Brigandt -- Commentaries : historical, biological, and philosophical perspectives -- Distrust that particular intuition : resilient essentialisms and empirical challenges in the history of biological individuality / James Elwick -- Biological individuality : a relational reading / Scott F. Gilbert -- Philosophical dimensions of individuality / Alan C. Love and Ingo Brigandt.
Summary: Individuals are things that everybody knows or thinks they do. Yet even scholars who practice or analyze the biological sciences often cannot agree on what an individual is and why. One reason for this disagreement is that the many important biological individuality concepts serve very different purposes defining, classifying, or explaining living structure, function, interaction, persistence, or evolution. Indeed, as the contributors to Biological Individuality reveal, nature is too messy for simple definitions of this concept, organisms too quirky in the diverse ways they reproduce, function, and interact, and human ideas about individuality too fraught with philosophical and historical meaning. Bringing together biologists, historians, and philosophers, this book provides a multifaceted exploration of biological individuality that identifies leading and less familiar perceptions of individuality both past and present, what they are good for, and in what contexts. Biological practice and theory recognize individuals at myriad levels of organization, from genes to organisms to symbiotic systems. We depend on these notions of individuality to address theoretical questions about multilevel natural selection and Darwinian fitness; to illuminate empirical questions about development, function, and ecology; to ground philosophical questions about the nature of organisms and causation; and to probe historical and cultural circumstances that resonate with parallel questions about the nature of society.
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction : working together on individuality / Lynn K. Nyhart and Scott Lidgard -- The work of biological individuality : concepts and contexts / Scott Lidgard and Lynn K. Nyhart -- Cells, colonies, and clones : individuality in the volvocine algae / Matthew D. Herron -- Individuality and the control of life cycles / Beckett Sterner -- Discovering the ties that bind : cell-cell communication and the development of cell sociology / Andrew S. Reynolds -- Alternation of generations and individuality, 1851 / Lynn K. Nyhart and Scott Lidgard -- Spencer's evolutionary entanglement : from liminal individuals to implicit collectivities / Snait Gissis -- Biological individuality and enkapsis : from Martin Heidenhain's synthesiology to the Völkisch national community / Olivier Rieppel -- Parasitology, zoology, and society in France, ca. 1880-1920 / Michael A. Osborne -- Metabolism, autonomy, and individuality / Hannah Landecker -- Bodily parts in the structure-function dialectic / Ingo Brigandt -- Commentaries : historical, biological, and philosophical perspectives -- Distrust that particular intuition : resilient essentialisms and empirical challenges in the history of biological individuality / James Elwick -- Biological individuality : a relational reading / Scott F. Gilbert -- Philosophical dimensions of individuality / Alan C. Love and Ingo Brigandt.

Individuals are things that everybody knows or thinks they do. Yet even scholars who practice or analyze the biological sciences often cannot agree on what an individual is and why. One reason for this disagreement is that the many important biological individuality concepts serve very different purposes defining, classifying, or explaining living structure, function, interaction, persistence, or evolution. Indeed, as the contributors to Biological Individuality reveal, nature is too messy for simple definitions of this concept, organisms too quirky in the diverse ways they reproduce, function, and interact, and human ideas about individuality too fraught with philosophical and historical meaning. Bringing together biologists, historians, and philosophers, this book provides a multifaceted exploration of biological individuality that identifies leading and less familiar perceptions of individuality both past and present, what they are good for, and in what contexts. Biological practice and theory recognize individuals at myriad levels of organization, from genes to organisms to symbiotic systems. We depend on these notions of individuality to address theoretical questions about multilevel natural selection and Darwinian fitness; to illuminate empirical questions about development, function, and ecology; to ground philosophical questions about the nature of organisms and causation; and to probe historical and cultural circumstances that resonate with parallel questions about the nature of society.

GRETA POINT: 573.2 BIO

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