Measurement of photosynthesis by infrared gas analysis

By: Browse, J.A. (DSIR, Plant Physiology Division. Palmerston North).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 1985Description: p. 397-413.ISBN: 0521249155.Subject(s): PHOTOSYNTHESIS | MEASURING INSTRUMENTS | MACROALGAE | INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY | SPECTROSCOPY | ANALYSIS | GAS METERS | ANALYZERS | CALIBRATION | DATA PROCESSING | METHODS | CARBON DIOXIDE
Incomplete contents:
Infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) are a convenient means of continuously measuring CO/sub 2/ concentration in the gas phase. Because of their sensitivity, reliability, and widespread commercial production they are by far the most widely used instruments for measuring net photosynthesis is terrestrial plants. The sensitivity of the IRGA is an advantage in studies of submerged aquatic plants also, because the relatively large changes in plant environment required for an estimate of photosynthesis using an oxygen electrode are no longer necessary, and open-circuit experiments (in which the plant is kept in steady state) can be carried out conveniently. Field techniques used on terrestrial plants and the adaption of these to the measurement of gas exchange of intertidal macroalgae during aerial exposure, are reviewed. (auth/pjl)
In: Ecological field methods : macroalgae / Littler, M.M. (ed.), Littler, D.S. (ed.) In: Handbook of phycological methods
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25 refs; 3 figs; 1 table.

Infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) are a convenient means of continuously measuring CO/sub 2/ concentration in the gas phase. Because of their sensitivity, reliability, and widespread commercial production they are by far the most widely used instruments for measuring net photosynthesis is terrestrial plants. The sensitivity of the IRGA is an advantage in studies of submerged aquatic plants also, because the relatively large changes in plant environment required for an estimate of photosynthesis using an oxygen electrode are no longer necessary, and open-circuit experiments (in which the plant is kept in steady state) can be carried out conveniently. Field techniques used on terrestrial plants and the adaption of these to the measurement of gas exchange of intertidal macroalgae during aerial exposure, are reviewed. (auth/pjl)

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