Sedimentation and volcanism in a Permian arc-related basin, southern New Zealand

By: Houghton, B.F. (University of Otago, Department of Geology. Dunedin) & (DSIR, New Zealand Geological Survey. Rotorua).
Contributor(s): Landis, C.A. (University of Otago, Department of Geology. Dunedin).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 1989Description: p. 433-450.ISSN: 0258-8900.Subject(s): TAKITIMU GROUP | PERMIAN | VOLCANICLASTICS | TURBIDITY | SEDIMENTARY BASINS | VOLCANISM | OCEAN BASINS | SOUTHLAND | SECTIONS | TYPE SECTIONS | NZMS260D44 | TAKITIMU MOUNTAINS | SEDIMENTATION
Incomplete contents:
An exceptionally well-exposed, ancient, intra-arc basin in the Permian Takitimu Group of New Zealand contains 14 km of interbedded primary volcanic and marine volcaniclastic rocks of basaltic to rhyodacitic composition. These are the products of subaerial and submarine arc volcanism and closely associated turbidite sedimentation. The Takitimu oceanic arc/basin setting formed a dynamic closed sedimentary system in which large volumes of volcaniclastic material generated at the arc was rapidly redeposited in marine basins flanking the eruptive centres. Volcanism probably included (1) moderate- to deep-water extrusion of lava and deposition of hyaloclastite, (2) extrusive and explosive eruptions from shallow marine to marginally emergent volcanoes in or on the margin of the basin, and (3) Plinian and phreato- Plinian eruptions from more distant subaerial vents along the arc. Much of the newly erupted materials was rapidly transported to the adjacent marine basin by debris flows, slumping and sliding. Hemipelagic sedimentation predominated on the outer margin of the basin, infrequently interrupted by deposition of ash from the most explosive arc volcanism and the arrival of extremely dilute turbidites. Turbidite sedimentation prevailed in the remainder of the basin, producing a thick prograding volcaniclastic apron adjacent to the arc. The volcaniclastic strata closely resemble classic turbidite deposits, and show similar lateral facies variations to submarine fan deposits. Study of such sequences provides in-sight into poorly understood processes in modern arc- related basins.
In: Bulletin of volcanology
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55 refs; 10 figs; 3 tables

An exceptionally well-exposed, ancient, intra-arc basin in the Permian Takitimu Group of New Zealand contains 14 km of interbedded primary volcanic and marine volcaniclastic rocks of basaltic to rhyodacitic composition. These are the products of subaerial and submarine arc volcanism and closely associated turbidite sedimentation. The Takitimu oceanic arc/basin setting formed a dynamic closed sedimentary system in which large volumes of volcaniclastic material generated at the arc was rapidly redeposited in marine basins flanking the eruptive centres. Volcanism probably included (1) moderate- to deep-water extrusion of lava and deposition of hyaloclastite, (2) extrusive and explosive eruptions from shallow marine to marginally emergent volcanoes in or on the margin of the basin, and (3) Plinian and phreato- Plinian eruptions from more distant subaerial vents along the arc. Much of the newly erupted materials was rapidly transported to the adjacent marine basin by debris flows, slumping and sliding. Hemipelagic sedimentation predominated on the outer margin of the basin, infrequently interrupted by deposition of ash from the most explosive arc volcanism and the arrival of extremely dilute turbidites. Turbidite sedimentation prevailed in the remainder of the basin, producing a thick prograding volcaniclastic apron adjacent to the arc. The volcaniclastic strata closely resemble classic turbidite deposits, and show similar lateral facies variations to submarine fan deposits. Study of such sequences provides in-sight into poorly understood processes in modern arc- related basins.

GS

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