Early geothermal development in New Zealand

By: Dench, N.D. (Geothermal Energy New Zealand Limited).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 1987Description: p. 23-27.ISSN: 0111-946X.Subject(s): GEOTHERMAL POWER | ENERGY RESOURCES | EXPLORATION | ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION | STEAM | WAIRAKEI | GEOTHERMAL FIELDS
Incomplete contents:
Following preliminary scientific exploration of the energy resources of the central volcanic region, the project at Wairakei was set up in 1950 to drill and test geothermal wells, with the objective of generating electric power. It was the first substantial undertaking in the world to convert geothermal water into electricity. The techniques used for drilling and fluid production evolved from water, petroleum and mining technology, plus the application of engineering principles and hard experience in the field. They have been applied world-wide, through study of our technical literature, consulting overseas by New Zealanders and the training of foreign personnel - particularly at the University of Auckland's Geothermal Institute. The Pioneering days at Wairakei have become part of scientific and engineering history in New Zealand.(auth)
In: Transactions of the Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand. Electrical/Mechanical/Chemical engineering section
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Includes bibliography

Following preliminary scientific exploration of the energy resources of the central volcanic region, the project at Wairakei was set up in 1950 to drill and test geothermal wells, with the objective of generating electric power. It was the first substantial undertaking in the world to convert geothermal water into electricity. The techniques used for drilling and fluid production evolved from water, petroleum and mining technology, plus the application of engineering principles and hard experience in the field. They have been applied world-wide, through study of our technical literature, consulting overseas by New Zealanders and the training of foreign personnel - particularly at the University of Auckland's Geothermal Institute. The Pioneering days at Wairakei have become part of scientific and engineering history in New Zealand.(auth)

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