Soils of part Wallace County, South Island, New Zealand

By: O'Byrne, T.N. (DSIR, New Zealand Soil Bureau. Lower Hutt).
Contributor(s): DSIR, New Zealand Soil Bureau. Lower Hutt.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: NZ Soil Survey report ; 91.Publisher: 1986Description: 120 p.ISSN: 0110-2079.Report number: NZSB-SSR--91Subject(s): WALLACE COUNTY | SOUTHLAND | SOILS | SOIL ANALYSIS | SOIL CLASSIFICATIONS | SOIL TYPES | SOIL MAP
Incomplete contents:
The soil inventory survey of Wallace County, Southland Province, New Zealand was mapped at a scale of 1:50,000 and covers approximately 700, 000 hectares out of a total of 965,600 hectares. The county has six physiographic units, each with distinct soil series peculiar to those units. Within these physiographic units the soils have been separated by differences in morphology, drainage and parent materials. Basement rocks of diverse origin in the mountain ranges are sources of alluvium in valley floors. One hundred and thirty-two soil mapping units, of which some 64 are named for the first time, are outlined on the 6 sheets of the map and are described in an extended legend and explanatory notes. Subsidiary maps illustrate the physiographic units and the extent of loess cover both shallow and deep deposits. Explanatory notes on the extended legend, correlation of soil units with South Island soil sets and classification of soils for land use are given in an appendix
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ABSTRACT ABSTRACT NIWA BIBLIOGRAPHY
1 Available 52240-1001

15 refs; 6 figs; 2 tables; 3 appendices; Includes O'Byrne, T.N. (1986) Soil map of part Wallace County. NZ Soil Bureau Map 223 (6 sheets) Price $70.00

The soil inventory survey of Wallace County, Southland Province, New Zealand was mapped at a scale of 1:50,000 and covers approximately 700, 000 hectares out of a total of 965,600 hectares. The county has six physiographic units, each with distinct soil series peculiar to those units. Within these physiographic units the soils have been separated by differences in morphology, drainage and parent materials. Basement rocks of diverse origin in the mountain ranges are sources of alluvium in valley floors. One hundred and thirty-two soil mapping units, of which some 64 are named for the first time, are outlined on the 6 sheets of the map and are described in an extended legend and explanatory notes. Subsidiary maps illustrate the physiographic units and the extent of loess cover both shallow and deep deposits. Explanatory notes on the extended legend, correlation of soil units with South Island soil sets and classification of soils for land use are given in an appendix

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