Report on the conditions of the forests of the Eyre Mountains / by J.D. Hayward.

By: Hayward, J. D.
Contributor(s): Forest & Range Experiment Station (Rangiora, N.Z.) | Forest Research Institute (N.Z.). Protection Forestry Branch.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Protection Forestry report: no. 70Publisher: Rangiora [N.Z.] : N.Z. Forest Service, Forest & Range Experiment Station, 1969Description: 24, [2] leaves : illustrations ; 30 cm.Subject(s): VEGETATION | FORESTS | BROWSING DAMAGE | BEECH FORESTS | EYRE MOUNTAINS | SOUTHLAND | NEW ZEALAND In: Protection Forestry reportSummary: In the past the Eyre Mountains supported an extensive area of forest, unbroken from river to bushline and separated from large areas of tussock grassland by a belt of subalpine scrub. The first section of this report describes the location and significance of the forests, the second section describes the physical features which influence forest development. The third defines the forest types present and the fourth the major modifying factors which affect them and the changes they have brought about. The last section describes the present condition of the forests and how they are likely to change in the future. The existing forest can be broadly classified into 3 main types: pure mountain beech on open dry slopes, ridges and disturbed areas; mixed silver beech mountain beech on the terraces and sheltered moister slopes - the most extensive type; Red beech, which forms isolate pockets on terraces and slopes in the lower reaches of the most rivers. (author)
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Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
JOURNAL JOURNAL WELLINGTON
STACK
STACK NO. 70 1969 1 Available J019741

13 references; 11 figures; 1 table.

In the past the Eyre Mountains supported an extensive area of forest, unbroken from river to bushline and separated from large areas of tussock grassland by a belt of subalpine scrub. The first section of this report describes the location and significance of the forests, the second section describes the physical features which influence forest development. The third defines the forest types present and the fourth the major modifying factors which affect them and the changes they have brought about. The last section describes the present condition of the forests and how they are likely to change in the future. The existing forest can be broadly classified into 3 main types: pure mountain beech on open dry slopes, ridges and disturbed areas; mixed silver beech mountain beech on the terraces and sheltered moister slopes - the most extensive type; Red beech, which forms isolate pockets on terraces and slopes in the lower reaches of the most rivers. (author)

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