Crest stage indicators - a note on the Hamilton experience / A. Dons and A.L. Singleton

By: Dons, A.
Contributor(s): Singleton, A.L. (NIWA. Hamilton) | Water Quality Centre (Hamilton, N.Z.).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Internal report / Water Quality Centre, Hamilton: no. 80/22Publisher: Hamilton, N.Z. : Hamilton Science Centre, 1980Description: 11 leaves ; 30 cm.Subject(s): RIVERS | COROMANDEL | RAGLAN | NEW ZEALAND | WATER QUALITYOnline resources: Click here to access online In: Internal report / Water Quality Centre, HamiltonSummary: Crest Stage Indicators are a relatively inexpensive means of gathering data on annual maximum discharges. They are basically an enclosed wooden stake set into the river bank and coated with a water soluble dye to record the maximum water level. The Hamilton hydrology group has evaluated the use of CSI during a 2 year period mainly in the Raglan and Coromandel areas. Construction details are given in addition to some results being discussed and an evaluation of their relative cost effectiveness. The study concluded that the design used in Hamilton was relatively reliable and inexpensive with the main problems being backwater effects, establishing a stage discharge relationship on a non culvert site and reducing fungal growth.
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Crest Stage Indicators are a relatively inexpensive means of gathering data on annual maximum discharges. They are basically an enclosed wooden stake set into the river bank and coated with a water soluble dye to record the maximum water level. The Hamilton hydrology group has evaluated the use of CSI during a 2 year period mainly in the Raglan and Coromandel areas. Construction details are given in addition to some results being discussed and an evaluation of their relative cost effectiveness. The study concluded that the design used in Hamilton was relatively reliable and inexpensive with the main problems being backwater effects, establishing a stage discharge relationship on a non culvert site and reducing fungal growth.

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