Tests to determine the effectiveness of methods for decontaminating materials that have been in contact with Didymosphenia geminata / C. Kilroy.

By: Kilroy, Cathy.
Contributor(s): Biosecurity New Zealand.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: NIWA client report ; CHC2006-116; NIWA Project ; MAF06506.Publisher: [Wellington, N.Z.] : MAF Biosecurity New Zealand, 2006Description: 30 p. : tables; 30 cm.Subject(s): DIDYMOSPHENIA GEMINATA | RESEARCH PROJECTS | SURVIVAL RATES | BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS | DIATOMS | ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS | RIVERS | CHEMICAL CONTROL | SOUTH ISLAND | LAKES | STREAMSHoldings: Electronic Online resources: Click here to access online | Click here to access online Abstract: NIWA was requested by Biosecurity New Zealand to test the effectiveness of a range of products as decontaminating agents for materials (clothing/equipment) that may be contaminated with the invasive diatom Didymosphenia geminata. Currently the species appears to be confined to the Mararoa and lower Waiau Rivers in Southland, and measures are in place to try to prevent its spread into other rivers. b0s Trials were conducted to find a method for distinguishing live and dead diatom cells. A staining technique using neutral red dye was considered to be the best general method available. Neutral red dye is taken up by the cytoplasm of live cells, but not dead cells. Observations on the microscopic appearance of cells can provide supplementary evidence of the effectiveness of some treatments. ... - Executive summary.
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SIRIS 1 Not for loan 145593-2001

"February 2005 (revised August 2006)"

Includes bibliographic references (p. 26-27).

NIWA was requested by Biosecurity New Zealand to test the effectiveness of a range of products as decontaminating agents for materials (clothing/equipment) that may be contaminated with the invasive diatom Didymosphenia geminata. Currently the species appears to be confined to the Mararoa and lower Waiau Rivers in Southland, and measures are in place to try to prevent its spread into other rivers. b0s Trials were conducted to find a method for distinguishing live and dead diatom cells. A staining technique using neutral red dye was considered to be the best general method available. Neutral red dye is taken up by the cytoplasm of live cells, but not dead cells. Observations on the microscopic appearance of cells can provide supplementary evidence of the effectiveness of some treatments. ... - Executive summary.

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