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A review of land-based effects on coastal fisheries and supporting biodiversity in New Zealand

Contributor(s): Morrison, M. A. (NIWA. Auckland) | Lowe, M. L. (NIWA. Auckland) | Parson, D. M. (NIWA. Auckland) | Usmar, N. R. (NIWA. Auckland) | McLeod, I. M. (NIWA. Auckland).
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: New Zealand aquatic environment and biodiversity report: no. 37Publisher: Wellington : Ministry of Fisheries, 2009Description: 100 p. : col. ill., col. maps ; 30 cm.ISSN: 1176-9440.Report number: CCMAU4 0907Subject(s): BIVALVES | CASE STUDIES | COASTAL FISHERIES | COASTAL ZONE | CRUSTACEANS | ESTUARIES | EUTROPHICATION | FISH | FRESH WATER | HUMAN FACTORS | IMPACTS | INTERACTIONS | LAND MANAGEMENT | LAND USE | MARINE ALGAE | MUSSELS | NEW ZEALAND | NUTRIENTS | POLLUTION | REVIEWS | SEDIMENTATION | SPECIES DIVERSITYOnline resources: Click here to access online In: New Zealand aquatic environment and biodiversity report In: New Zealand aquatic environment and biodiversity reportSummary: Land-based effects on coastal fisheries may occur through a diversity of mechanisms. Changing inputs from the land have included large volumes of suspended sediments and nutrients into the coastal zone, such as pastoral livestock farming, dairying, and exotic plantation forestry. More localised effects such as pastoral livestock fanning, dairying, and exotic plantation forestry. More localised effects from urbanisation have included elevations of heavy metal concentrations and pollution from sewage. Impacts from such activities have continued into the present day. Commercial coastal fisheries have been established over the same time period, with initial periods of heavy utilisation leading to overfishing of many stocks, and subsequent catch reductions to more sustainable levels. Most fisheries are now managed under the Quota Management System which generally applies Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) targets, under which stocks are fished down to a level where productivity is thought to be highest.
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Item type Current location Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
JOURNAL JOURNAL WELLINGTON
JOURNALS
CORE NO. 37 2009 1 Available J015038
JOURNAL JOURNAL WELLINGTON
JOURNALS
CORE NO. 37 2009 2 Available J015039

Includes bibliographical references (p. 78-100).

Land-based effects on coastal fisheries may occur through a diversity of mechanisms. Changing inputs from the land have included large volumes of suspended sediments and nutrients into the coastal zone, such as pastoral livestock farming, dairying, and exotic plantation forestry. More localised effects such as pastoral livestock fanning, dairying, and exotic plantation forestry. More localised effects from urbanisation have included elevations of heavy metal concentrations and pollution from sewage. Impacts from such activities have continued into the present day. Commercial coastal fisheries have been established over the same time period, with initial periods of heavy utilisation leading to overfishing of many stocks, and subsequent catch reductions to more sustainable levels. Most fisheries are now managed under the Quota Management System which generally applies Maximum Sustainable Yield (MSY) targets, under which stocks are fished down to a level where productivity is thought to be highest.

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