Antarctic fish biology : evolution in a unique environment / Joseph T. Eastman ; illustrations and graphics by Danette Pratt ; photography by William Winn.

By: Eastman, Joseph T.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: San Diego : Academic Press, c1993Description: xiii, 322 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0122281403.Subject(s): ANTARCTICA | SOUTHERN OCEAN | FISH | NOTOTHENIA | BIOLOGY | EVOLUTION | PHYSIOLOGYHoldings: GRETA POINT: 597(269) ANT
Contents:
The Antarctic Environment. Past and Present: Physical and Biological Characteristics of the Antarctic Marine Environment. Geologic and Climatic History of Antarctica. The Fossil Fish Faunas. The Modern Fauna: Biology and Relationships: The Modern Fauna: Zoogeography. The Modern Fauna: Taxonomic Composition. The Modern Fauna: Notothenioids. Systematic Relationships of Notothenioids. Zoogeographic Origins and Evolution of the Modern Fauna. Organ System Adaptation in Notothenioids: Biochemistry and Metabolism. Evolutionary Modification of Buoyancy. Anti-Freeze Glycopeptides. Muscular System and Swimming. Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems. Nervous System and Special Senses. Final Remarks and Outlook. References. Index.
Abstract: This important volume provides an original synthesis and novel overview of Antarctic fish biology, detailing the evolution of these fish in some of the most unusual and extreme environments in the world. Focusing on one group of fish, the notothenoioids, which contain the majority of the current organismal diversity, this book describes a fauna that has evolved in isolation and experienced incredible adaptive radiation by acquiring numerous physiological specializations. Darwin's finches and African cichlids may be joined by Antarctic fishes as exemplars of adaptive radiation. The books' coverage is detailed and comprehensive, and the author clearly recognizes the fact that these fish are a component of a most interesting and biologically unique ecosystem and environment. Topics in Antarctic Fish Biology include past and present environments, fossil records, taxonomic composition of fauna, systematic relationships, diversification, and physiological adaptations.
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597(269) ANT 1 Issued 16/09/2016 B012126

Includes bibliographical references (p. 279-314) and index.

The Antarctic Environment. Past and Present: Physical and Biological Characteristics of the Antarctic Marine Environment. Geologic and Climatic History of Antarctica. The Fossil Fish Faunas. The Modern Fauna: Biology and Relationships: The Modern Fauna: Zoogeography. The Modern Fauna: Taxonomic Composition. The Modern Fauna: Notothenioids. Systematic Relationships of Notothenioids. Zoogeographic Origins and Evolution of the Modern Fauna. Organ System Adaptation in Notothenioids: Biochemistry and Metabolism. Evolutionary Modification of Buoyancy. Anti-Freeze Glycopeptides. Muscular System and Swimming. Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems. Nervous System and Special Senses. Final Remarks and Outlook. References. Index.

This important volume provides an original synthesis and novel overview of Antarctic fish biology, detailing the evolution of these fish in some of the most unusual and extreme environments in the world. Focusing on one group of fish, the notothenoioids, which contain the majority of the current organismal diversity, this book describes a fauna that has evolved in isolation and experienced incredible adaptive radiation by acquiring numerous physiological specializations. Darwin's finches and African cichlids may be joined by Antarctic fishes as exemplars of adaptive radiation. The books' coverage is detailed and comprehensive, and the author clearly recognizes the fact that these fish are a component of a most interesting and biologically unique ecosystem and environment. Topics in Antarctic Fish Biology include past and present environments, fossil records, taxonomic composition of fauna, systematic relationships, diversification, and physiological adaptations.

GRETA POINT: 597(269) ANT

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